Nine Tried and True Photography Tips

Here are a few pointers for photographers who want to improve their techniques. From holiday snapshots to professional portraits, apply these tips for better quality images.

1. Try the celebrity stance.

A trick used by celebrity photographers is to have the subject angle one shoulder slightly towards the camera for a more elegant and slender look.

2. Lower the light.

When using low light, if you don’t want to use a flash, try bumping up your ISO setting to 800 or 1600.

3. Group shot solution.

The larger the group, the larger the print should be. This will help ensure everyone will be seen clearly.

4. Do as the pros do.

Make it a habit of studying the work of professionals to help expand your own ideas on composition, poses, backgrounds, lighting etc… Become a regular at photography shows and exhibits locally.

5. Crop-Correct

Review your cropped images at least a couple times after cropping (make sure to keep your original!) and before printing. A sloppily cropped image can mean the difference between a simple snapshot and a professional photo.

6. Don’t leave home without your camera.

And your camera phone doesn’t count! How can you get an award winning shot if you aren’t prepared? Excellent photographic oppurtunties await you at every turn.

7. Use a new angle.

Tilt your camera at a strong angle, and you will find you’ve created a much more interesting perspective.

8. Time it just right.

Remember that old saying “Think before you speak.” ? Well the same applies to photography – just replace the word “speak” with the word “click”.  So often we find something that absolutely begs to be photographed, and we become so overwhelmed with the action itself that we forget ourselves (photographers). Be aware of what’s going on around you, not just in the frame. Especially when outdoors. You may not see the  pedestrians in your viewfinder, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t only 10 feet away from being right in front of you. A photographer never snaps first and asks questions later. Why do you think your co-worker’s snapshot of their 3 year old has someone’s dirty socks hanging out in the background? Don’t be your co-worker!

9. Reflect.

Nothing’s more fun than “creating” an effect using nothing more than your own imagination and your camera. Look for ways to use water, mirrors and windows to add interest to your images.

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